Sea Otter 2014 – Garmin Edge 1000 and Edge Remote

by Brian Mullin on April 27, 2014

Edge 1000


The
Garmin Edge 1000 is their new top of the line bike computer that
features a 3-inch touchscreen display with a full-color 240 x 400 pixel
resolution, and it has an ambient light sensor that automatically adjusts the screen brightness, which is especially useful
in low-light conditions. The screen has dual-orientation capabilities so it can be set up horizontally for a wide view in addition to the standard vertical mount.

Its
communication technologies include WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0 and ANT+,
allowing integration with multiple biking and mobile devices. It’s
compatible with the Shimano Di2 shifting system, displaying the current
gear on the screen, and it can be paired with ANT+ training products
such as heart-rate monitors, power meters and speed/cadence sensors.
With a paired Bluetooth smartphone, you can use the Garmin Connect site
to upload and download ride data, and share a ride in real time with
friends and family, and it will even alert you to incoming calls, text message and weather on the screen.

 
The Edge 1000 has
a larger but thinner body compared to the Edge 810, and it comes with
their standard and new extended out-front mount, which has an easy to use
hinged handlebar clamp with a one bolt mechanism.

Like the Edge Touring, the 1000 will come preloaded with maps and points of interest, and it has a rudimentary turn-buy-turn function. It has a round trip route feature in which you input a distance, and it will offer three routes to choose from with their own pertinent elevation profiles. Some of the training features might not be as applicable to mountain bikers, but it does have an in-ride competition capability via Garmin Connect segments for a Strava like experience.

The
Edge 1000 will be available this spring for $599.99 alone or as a
$699.99 bundle that includes a heart-rate strap and speed/cadence
sensors.

Hands-on with the Edge 1000 => The screen has a much better resolution than its predecessors, and the additional size makes it easier to see and use the mapping functions, along with larger fonts for data output. The plethora of data, functions and menus make it a very robust computer, and I can’t wait to try it out in a real world riding experience.

Edge Remote Control

Garmin also introduced a spiffy new three-button remote control that will initiate multiple actions on the Edge.
Two of the three buttons are hard-set for marking laps and scrolling
forward/backwards between data pages while riding, while the third
button is programmable from a predefined list of functions. You can even
stop and stop recording of a VIRB camera using the remote, making it a
nice cross functional unit.

The remote has a center LED light
that illuminates red or green based on the button presses or during
pairing, and it attaches with a rubber band-style system to connect to
the handlebars. The Edge Remote Control is available now and retails for
$49.99.

Hands-on with the Edge Remote => It was pretty cool to roll through pages on the Edge 1000 by just tapping the button, and I think it will be a useful and functional item to add to your handlebars to control the 1000. When you’re on the fly, it can be tough to hit those little page arrows on the screen, and this seems like a great way to leave your hands on the bars.

For more information:  www.garmin.com

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